A photographic food adventure

Posts tagged ‘vegetarian’

Winter Vegetable Soup

Hey guys,

Winter’s coming, last week we had a “weatherbomb” with wind and rain and general coldness so I felt it was the perfect time to make soup.

This soup is very easy but you may want to freeze some of it coz it makes a LOT of soup, unless you want to eat soup for like 2 weeks straight. I’m not sure if it’s possible to make a smaller batch.

Ingredients:

1 packet King traditional soup mix
9 cups water
Vegetables of your choice, diced into similar sizes (I used 3 potatoes, a quarter of a pumpkin, half an onion, 3 big cloves of garlic, 2 carrots and 4 sticks of celery)
A tin of tomatoes
A few tablespoons of tomato paste
Pepper
Salt
Stock cubes (If you taste the soup after an hour or two and it tastes bland)

Method:

As I said earlier, this recipe is VERY easy, it’s basically just throwing everything into a pot and boiling it for 2 and a half hours, or until your vegetables are cooked and the soup tastes like all the flavours have been incorporated into the soup.

The first step is to chop your vegetables (I don’t have a picture of this, I was too hungry and desperate to make soup fast!). Dice them into bite-sized pieces but all similar sizes so they cook evenly but you boil them for so long they’ll all cook eventually anyway but it’s best to cook them at a size to make them easy to eat in a mouthful with other vegies and liquid (the rest of the soup).

Put the soup mix into a large, large pot.

Add water and bring to the boil on high heat.

Using medium heat, add hard diced vegetables like potatoes, pumpkin, kumara etc, things that take longer to cook than other vegetables. I also added my garlic at this point to start adding flavour to the soup.

Cook those vegetables for 30 minutes before adding softer vegetables like leek, celery, onion, whatever else as well as your tin of tomatoes and tomato paste and salt and pepper.

Stir in the soft vegetables and cover soup for 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Taste occasionally also, if the flavour doesn’t start to develop, add a stock cube or 4 to add flavour.

Using a fork, try one of the hard vegetables to make sure they’re cooked (it would be completely stupid if they weren’t by this point). Try some of the soup liquid also. Add more salt and pepper if it doesn’t taste flavoursome.

Spoon into bowls using a ladle, cut some nice crusty bread and enjoy!

Tory.

 

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Fried Noodles [yeah, im making legit mee goreng]

OK I lied, its not THAT legit. It’s more of a cross between packet mee goreng, and real mee goreng
But before I continue, I’M SO SORRY about my unplanned gigantic hiatus… moving was more hectic than I expected, and for the first couple of weeks of Dunedin I lived off takeaways and two minute noodles [like one of those stereotypical poor students. It really does happen, guys.] So anyway, I was hoping to get a baking recipe in when I got back, but that kinda failed. Hopefully I’ll be in a sweet routine once uni starts up again and I can gift you with lots of delish treats 🙂 But in the meantime, hope you like this simple one!

PS: Photos might be a bit strange because I thought I would experiment with my phone this time 😀

Ingredients
half an onion, diced
3-5 cloves of garlic [this time I used garlic paste.. about a tablespoon]
2 cups frozen vegetables [my fav is the asian mix because it has capsicum in it!]
Flavouring sauce, stock, or some kind of chilli-based stir fry paste… [that sounds a bit confusing, but this recipe is so versatile that you can really use anything you want to flavour it. I used a packet Nasi Goreng paste, which is actually used for Fried Rice, but I thought i’d try it with noodles just for funsies.]
Packet noodles of any kind [most supermarkets stock packets of noodles that you can just chuck in boiling water for a bit and use]
Salt and pepper to taste

MeeGoreng (1) MeeGoreng (3)

Method

Fry onion and garlic in a little oil until fragrant.

MeeGoreng (2)

Add paste or chosen flavouring and fry for a couple of minutes before adding the frozen vegetables.

MeeGoreng (4) MeeGoreng (5)

Stir the mixture until vegetables have been defrosted.

MeeGoreng (6)

Cook the noodles separately according to the instructions on the packet. Drain and add to the mixture.

MeeGoreng (7)

Mix well, add salt and pepper to taste. Serve!

MeeGoreng (8) MeeGoreng (9)

You can also meat to this recipe if you like, as long as its pre-cooked. As I said, very versatile. And I will probably show you fried rice sometime, but its basically the same method, but swapping the noodles for cooked rice. We will take pictures of that sometime 🙂

Nurul.

Tomato and Red Capsicum Risotto

Hey guys,

This is one of my favourite recipes, something I make SO often. If you’re not a fan of tomatoes and or capsicum, this risotto can have anything added to it, including meat (if you MUST ruin a perfectly good recipe with meat).

I often make this recipe using mushrooms instead of tomatoes and capsicum. The only difference in that scenario is to fry the mushrooms before starting the risotto then leave them aside and re-add them later in the process. But anything can be added at the right stage (which I’ll specify in the recipe).

I made this with a friend this time and he said “this risotto is delicious” (he told me to quote him!), but also, I made the mushroom version for him once and even though he doesn’t like mushrooms, he still loved it so it’s proof that if you make something well, if you add heaps of flavour to food, it can be yummy even if someone doesn’t like an ingredient in the recipe.

This recipe is originally from Jamie Oliver, it’s his Basic Risotto with a few added twists from me. I know you may be thinking “OMG, if Jamie Oliver is making this recipe, how the heck will I be able to cope with it?!”, But just read the recipe and try it, risotto may be something you eat at nice restaurants but it’s actually REALLY easy to make.

 

Ingredients:
2-4 cups of vegetable stock (start with 2, if the rice isn’t cooked with that much, add more.)
Olive oil
Half an onion, diced (I always use half an onion but you are welcome to use a whole onion if you like onion)
2-5 cloves of garlic, crushed (Like Nurul, I love garlic, as a vegetarian it is THE most important ingredient you will ever use)
1 cup of Arborio rice (Any rice can be used but Arborio rice is specifically used for risotto so works better. Can be found in your local supermarket in the rice section).
2 glasses (or half a bottle) of white wine (I enjoy using Sav Blanc wine, usually a cheap one, at that but the professional chefs always say “don’t cook with any wine you wouldn’t drink yourself”, of course, I love drinking cheap wine so quite happy to use it in recipes!)
One red capsicum, diced
One can of tomatoes
A sprinkle of dried mixed herbs
Salt
Chilli (Something you know I use in every recipe, can be left out but great for flavour)
Parmesan cheese (optional)

 

Method:

Heat the stock in a pot on low heat. Meanwhile in a frying pan or pot heat the olive oil, add the onions and garlic and fry very slowly for about 15 minutes without colouring.

When the vegetables have softened, add the rice and turn up the heat.

The rice will now begin to lightly fry, so keep stirring it. After a minute it will look slightly translucent. Add the wine and keep stirring — it will smell fantastic. Any harsh alcohol flavours will evaporate and leave the rice with a tasty essence.

Once the wine has cooked into the rice, add your first ladle of hot stock and a good pinch of salt, the chilli and the herbs. Turn down the heat to a simmer so the rice doesn’t cook too quickly on the outside. Keep adding ladlefuls of stock, stirring and almost massaging the creamy starch out of the rice, allowing each ladleful to be absorbed before adding the next (THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT, make sure the last ladleful of stock is absorbed before adding the next in every step). This will take around 15 minutes.

After the wine has incorporated and you have added your first ladleful of stock and it has also incorporated into the rice, this is the step where you should add anything you need to add, whether that be fried mushrooms, capsicums, meat or whatever. However, don’t add the tomatoes just yet. Don’t forget to check the seasoning carefully.

Add another ladleful of stock. Wait for it to incorporate. Taste the rice to see if it’s soft yet. It shouldn’t be completely soft so add the can of tomatoes. Keep adding ladlefuls of stock until the rice is soft. If you run out of stock before the rice is cooked, add some boiling water.

Once the rice is oozy and soft and 98% of the liquid is absorbed, your risotto is ready to be served. Do not, I repeat DO NOT serve if the rice is swimming in liquid, the liquid must be mostly absorbed.

This is how your final plate of risotto should look, it should be able to stand by itself without oozing all over the plate but a bit of ooze is all part of it. Here you can add some parmesan and enjoy!

I hope you find this recipe as easy as I do. If you have any questions though, please contact me through the blog and I’ll be happy to help. I want everyone to enjoy this recipe as much as I do and not be scared of it.

 

Tory.

Fettucine with Creamy Spinach and Roasted Tomato

Hi guys,

This isn’t the most exciting recipe ever but it’s actually better than I thought it would be, I thought it would be bland but if you season it right, it’s a tasty, fast, cheap meal.

This recipe, like my last recipe, is from Vegetarian Cooking, A Commonsense Guide.

Ingredients:
I don’t usually put measurements in my ingredients list because I’m usually cooking for one or two so I make enough for what I need, I believe cooking is about estimation rather than measurement. This particular recipe serves 4-6 but I didn’t make that much. Also, the times in the method are what the recipe says, I don’t usually time what I’m doing, it’s fairly obvious when something is cooked or has simmered enough or whatever. 

A tomato
Butter
Half an onion, chopped roughly
2 garlic cloves, crushed
Spinach (I used frozen spinach)
One cup vegetable stock
Half a cup of cream
Fresh fettucine

Method:

Preheat the oven to 220 degrees celcius. Cut tomatoes in half lengthways then cut each half into three wedges. Place on a lightly greased baking tray and roast for 30-35 minutes or until softened.

Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large frying pan. Sauté the onion and garlic over medium heat for 5 minutes or until the onion is soft, add the spinach.

Add the stock and cream, increase heat to high and bring to the boil. Simmer rapidly for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of salted boiling water until al dente. Drain well and return to pan. (Here I also took the tomatoes out of the oven).

Remove spinach mixture from heat and season well. (Note, the stock makes the sauce salty enough but taste it to see and if it needs more salt, add it. I also added my usual ground chilli here too.) Cool slightly then blend in a food processor until smooth.

Toss through the pasta until coated.

Divide in serving bowls and top with roasted tomatoes.

Enjoy.

Tory.

Introduction and Mushroom Pot Pies

Welcome to The Young and Hungry.

Before I start with my first recipe, I’ll introduce myself to you: I’m Tory, I’m from Wellington and I’m a vegetarian with a passion for desserts, so now you know what to expect from my recipes. However, I do eat fish so there may be some fish recipes included every now and again.

As you may have already read in the “About” section, I’m not the only author of The Young and Hungry, you will hear from my friend Nurul later on as we’ll post twice a week each starting from next week.

My first recipe is Mushroom Pot Pies from “Vegetarian Cooking, a Commonsense Guide”, a recipe book I’ll use fairly frequently.

I will add my own commentary to the method in italics, as well as some notes at the start or end of each recipe that are helpful or interesting about my experience of the recipe.

Ingredients:
Olive oil
A leek (white part only) (I used half an onion instead)
A couple of crushed garlic cloves
Large field mushrooms, peeled and diced
Thyme
1 cup cream
1 sheet puff pastry
1 egg, beaten
Salt and pepper
Note: Meat such as bacon can be added to this recipe if you feel it’s necessary to ruin a perfectly good pie with meat.

Method:

Preheat oven to 180 C . Heat one tablespoon of olive oil in a frying pan. Sauté the leek/onion and garlic over medium heat for 5 minutes or until the leek/onion is soft and translucent. Transfer onto a plate.

Heat another tablespoon of oil in the frying pan over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, stirring frequently for 5-7 minutes or until the mushrooms have released their juices and are soft and slightly coloured.

Add leek/onion and garlic mixture into frying pan with mushrooms. Add thyme and salt. (Fresh thyme can be used but I used dry thyme from a packet). Here I also added a sprinkle of ground chilli, something I do often in my cooking, as I love a bit of a kick, it is not on the recipe and is optional but I personally find it adds to the flavour.

Turn up the heat to high and add cream.

Stirring occasionally, cook for 7-8 minutes or until the cream has reduced to a thick sauce. Remember to taste as you go and add more salt and pepper if you feel it needs more, because I add chilli, I usually don’t use pepper.

Divide mushrooms into ramekins or ovenproof bowls, I had enough mushrooms for two pies but if you want to make a bigger batch, add more mushrooms.  Cut the pastry into rounds about the same size as each ramekin.

Brush the rim of each ramekin with some beaten egg yolk, place the pastry rounds on top and press down on the pastry to seal. Brush the tops with the remaining egg yolk.

Place the ramekins on a baking tray and bake for 20-25 minutes or until the pastry is puffed and golden. Serve hot.

Finished product:

Note: This was my first time making these pies and I found, when I took the pies out of the oven and cracked open the pastry, the creamy mushroom mixture had separated slightly so some of the oil from the cream was visible and although not visually appealing, it didn’t seem to effect the flavour of the pies. I’m not sure if there is a way to prevent this separation, let me know if you know.

Tory.